History Day Awards

The Ohio Historical Records Advisory Board salutes Ohio students’ use of primary sources in research and scholarship with awards to recognize the best use of Ohio’s historical records in a History Day project.

Criteria:

Projects must demonstrate exceptional use of Ohio primary sources, either originals orcopies (in formats such as photocopies, microforms, or digital). Ohio primary sources are those either created in Ohio or held in an Ohio repository. Primary sources represent a
first-hand account contemporaneous with the events or people researched. Primary
sources may include: correspondence (letters, memos, email), diaries, sound recordings,
moving images (films, video), photographs, architectural records, maps, and similar
material.

Eligibility:

Individual or group junior or senior division entries in the following categories: paper and
web site.

Resources:


2017 Awards

The Ohio Historical Records Advisory Board made two awards of $100 each recognizing the best use of Ohio’s historical records in a History Day project.

  • The OHRAB History Day award recipient in the Senior category is Ian Riddle for the paper “How Can You Run When You Know?”: Neil Young’s “Ohio”, the Kent State Incident, and Musical Protest During the Vietnam War.  The author weaves primary sources throughout the paper and such sources serve as an inspiration for extended and thoughtful analysis.  The author effectively utilized a range of archival collections and a range of types of sources, including oral histories, newspapers, research polls, interviews, and song lyrics.  The paper represents a strong and imaginative interdisciplinary effort.
  • The OHRAB History Day award recipient in the Junior category is Connor Stanton for the paper Sheppard v. Maxwell: The Right to a Fair Trial Takes the Stand.  The author effectively uses government records and documents such as court cases along with other primary sources such as interviews and newspaper articles to represent in detail and thoughtfully analyze and balance various positions and interpretations.  The paper represents a thorough, well-balanced, and thoughtful effort.

2016 Awards

The Ohio Historical Records Advisory Board made two awards of $100 each recognizing the best use of Ohio’s historical records in a History Day project.

  • Jane Nilson received the OHRAB History Day Award in the Junior category for her paper A Violent Encounter: Cleveland’s Hough Riots. The author of this winning paper infused her paper with primary sources such as interviews, transcripts, articles, grand jury reports, and speeches to really place the reader in the midst of the Hough Riots while they were happening, while at the same time providing context to what was happening with the Civil Rights movement around the country and the after effects in the City of Cleveland.
  • Elizabeth Coulter received the OHRAB History Day Award in the Senior category for her website Ohio Penitentiary Fire.  Motivated by a personal connection to the topic, the author of this winning website wove together a tale of tragedy and how it lead to modern reforms in Ohio’s prison system.   The story was told using primary source material such as photographs and newspaper articles written at the time, as well as public records from the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Corrections.

2015 Awards

The Ohio Historical Records Advisory Board made two awards of $100 each to recognize the best use of Ohio’s historical records in a History Day project.

  • John Victor Pan was recognized for his website “John D. Rockefeller: Industrial and Philanthropic Leader.” Winning the junior category, Pan used government documents, photographs, articles and political cartoons in his website to better understand the varying perspectives through which people viewed John D. Rockefeller. The project website is located at http://71811685.nhd.weebly.com.
  • Jeremy Gimbel won the senior category for his website “Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld: A Man Obsessed with Peace.” Gimbel wove photographs, books, policies, and bulletins from the archives at Fairmount Temple in Cleveland, Ohio, along with images, maps and letters from the digital archives at the University of Southern Mississippi into his telling of how Rabbi Lelyveld’s efforts in championing civil rights and global equality impacted both the larger national story and the history of his own congregation in Cleveland. Gimbel’s project website is located at http://56292800.nhd.weebly.com.

2014 Awards

The Ohio Historical Records Advisory Board made two awards of $100 each to recognize the best use of Ohio’s historical records in a History Day project.

  • Josh Podl and Jacob Voyzey, Shaker Heights High School, for their History Day senior group website “Ludlow: A Revolution in Grassroots Integration.” The authors of this website spent time at the Shaker Historical Society and Shaker Heights Library going over archival collections from the Ludlow Community Association and the Shaker Heights Protective Association. They used reports and records from these two organizations, along with recorded first-hand accounts in order to provide content, context and detail focusing on a small, local community’s actions within the broader context of national Civil Rights Movement.
  • Alan Luntz, Shaker Heights High School, for his History Day website “Lighting the Flames of Freedom: The American Movement to Save Soviet Jewry.” The author used primary source collections from a variety of Ohio archives including the Western Reserve Historical Society and the Jacob Rader Marcus Center of the American Jewish Archives as well as national collections found online. Records used for research included an original manuscript, telephone transcripts, first-hand accounts, video footage, letters, oral histories and more. The OHRAB review committee was particularly struck by the detailed annotated bibliography that guided readers precisely on how to find the same primary sources by citing the collections down to the series, folder, and item.

2013 Awards

The Ohio Historical Records Advisory Board made two awards of $100 each to recognize the best use of Ohio’s historical records in a History Day project.

  • Marcia Brown and Abby White, Shaker Heights High School, for their History Day senior group website “From Pulpit to Protest: Ohio’s Lane Rebels.” The authors of this website used a variety of Ohio primary sources, from writings of the subjects themselves to speeches, annual reports, letters, and formal statements issued by organizations and individuals to gain their own perspective into not only the debates themselves, but what was going on in the larger national view at the time as well as to delve into the thoughts and motivations of the key players themselves.
  • Joan Colleran and Katelyn Vlastaris, Laurel School, for their History Day senior group website “The Election of Carl Stokes: A Turning Point in the Long Road Toward Overcoming Racial Barriers.” The authors of this website picked a local topic specifically for the availability of Ohio primary source materials, including documents, photographs, local newspapers and government documents to provide both first hand accounts of what was going on in Cleveland at the time of the election and broader context of the Civil Rights Movement.

Additional information about History Day in Ohio can be found @ the Ohio History Day website.


2012 Awards

The Ohio Historical Records Advisory Board made two awards of $100 each to recognize the best use of Ohio’s historical records in a History Day project.

The Ohio Historical Records Advisory Board made two awards of $100 each to recognize the best use of Ohio’s historical records in a History Day project.

  • Hannah Cipinko, from Langston Middle School, for her paper “€œFrom Cincinnati to Oberlin: The Story of the Lane Rebels”
  • Maya Farhat, from Birchwood School, for her paper “Jane Edna Hunter: a Revolutionary Reformer in Cleveland’s Black Community.”€
2012 National History Day OHRAB Award Winners

Hannah Cipinko (L) and Maya Farhat (R) receive their 2012 OHRAB History Day Awards from OHRAB Chair Janet Carleton (center).

Additional information about History Day in Ohio can be found @ the Ohio History Day website.


2011 Awards

The Ohio Historical Records Advisory Board made two awards of $100 each to recognize the best use of Ohio’s historical records in a History Day project.

2011 National History Day OHRAB Award Winners

Sachi Gosain and Joan Colleran receive their 2011 OHRAB History Day Awards from OHRAB member Dan Noonan.

Additional information about History Day in Ohio can be found @ the Ohio History Day website.


2010 Awards

The Ohio Historical Records Advisory Board made two awards of $250 each to recognize the best use of Ohio’s historical records in a History Day project.

  • Amir Farhat. “Garrett Augustus Morgan: An Innovator Whose Inventions Still Save Many Lives Today”
  • Ruolin Yang. “Canals and Locks – What America Has Forgotten”

Additional information about History Day in Ohio can be found @ the Ohio History Day website.